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Inequality, Conflict and Social Justice

This course consists of two components: (1) the examination of the variable linkages between inequality (economic, social, political), injustice, and violent conflict; and (2) the examination of efforts to create environments characterized by equality, equity, justice and peace.

Faculty of Human Sciences >> Conflict Studies

Minimize schedule Course schedule for the session: Winter 2022
Section Schedule Day Location Professor
Lecture
ECS 2192 WA00
The course is prerecorded (asynchronous mode) and offered only online via Brightspace.
Course offered in English
January 10 - April 09 N/A Online Peter Pandimakil
Summary

This course consists of two components: (1) the examination of the variable linkages between inequality (economic, social, political), injustice, and violent conflict; and (2) the examination of efforts to create environments characterized by equality, equity, justice  

and peace. 

Objectives
  • To identify the different dimensions of inequality. 

  • To examine if/when social inequality provokes/engenders conflict. 

  • To study concrete cases of inequality within Canada, and possibly apply a comparative perspective in evaluating them. 

  • To explore theoretical and practical ways to enable equality, equity, justice and peace in economic, social and political realms. 

  • To indicate the merits and demerits of various approaches to social justice. 

Workload

Class attendance and participation; critical summaries of mandatory readings; class presentation; final research paper. 

Assessment

Class attendance and Participation: (10%). The active participation of all students is essential to a successful course; participation in class activities is expected.  Students who need to be absent must advise the professor in writing in advance.   

Four critical summaries of mandatory readings: (20%). Details will be given in the syllabus. 

Class presentation and discussion: (30%). Details will be given in the syllabus. 

Final research paper: (40%). Due dates and further details will be given in the syllabus to be posted on Brightspace by January 2022. 

Mandatory Reading

MANDATORY READINGS [If the links below do not work, please search by author/title] 

Sen, Amartya. 1999. Inequality Re-examined (Russell Sage Foundation), pp 12-30: chapter 1: Equality of What? http://www.oxfordscholarship.com.proxy.bib.uottawa.ca/view/10.1093/0198289286.001.0001/acprof-9780198289289) 

Nussbaum, Martha C. 2003. Capabilities as fundamental entitlements: Sen and social justice. Feminist Economics 9 (2–3): 33–59. 

Milanovi?Branko. 2016. Global inequality: a new approach for the age of globalization. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press (online resource at OU). 

McMullin, Julie Ann. 2010. Understanding social inequality: intersections of class, age, gender, ethnicity, and race in Canada, (Don Mills, Ont.: Oxford University Press), pp. 3-17: Introduction; 106-122: Actors and Agency; & 123-137: Actors and Cage(s) (available at St. Paul University HN 110. Z9 S642 2010) 

Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of CanadaExecutive Summary: 

 

OTHER READINGS 

More readings (required and recommended) will be included in the syllabus to be posted. 

Important Information

A detailed syllabus will be posted at LMS/Brightspace site by January 2022.