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Certificate in Conflict Resolution

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  • General information
  • Teaching staff
  • Admission
  • Program requirements
  • Courses
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The Certificate in Conflict Resolution is an independent undergraduate program comprising 30 credits, leading to a diploma, or undergraduate certificate, approved by the Senate.

Certificate programs are part-time programs; courses cannot be taken on a full-time basis unless prerequisites can be fully respected.

Do not hesitate to contact an Academic Advisor to obtain more information.

Applications: A step-by-step guide

STEP 1: Choose a program of study
STEP 2: Learn about admission requirements
STEP 3: Submit your application
STEP 4: Gather the documents needed for the assessment of your application
STEP 5: Assessment of your application
STEP 6: Accept your offer of admission
STEP 7: Choose your courses

STEP 1: CHOOSE A PROGRAM OF STUDY

Undergraduate programs:

STEP 2: LEARN ABOUT ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

 



Ontario applicants

From secondary school
Have an Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) with at least six 4U or 4M level courses, including one 4U level course in English or français.

From Ontario Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology (CAAT)

  • After one year of studies
    You are eligible if you have completed one year of a college program and have obtained the Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) with one language course (English or français) at the college or 4U level.
  • After a two- or three-year program
    If you have completed a two- or three-year college program, you can obtain up to 30 credits of advanced standing (transfer credits).

Our transfer agreements
Saint Paul University has developed a number of transfer agreements with colleges, allowing applicants to receive up to 30 equivalency credits. Find out more by consulting the tab entitled College Credit Transfer.

Quebec applicants

From secondary school
Have a Secondary School Diploma with an average of 84%, including one course in English or français at the Secondary V level.

From Cégep
Have completed 12 courses of general studies (not including physical education and refresher courses), including English (603) or français (601). Applicants who have successfully completed 12 courses of general studies may obtain up to 15 credits of advanced standing, and those who have successfully completed more than 12 courses of general studies may obtain up to 30 credits of advanced standing.

Applicants from the Atlantic and Western provinces

Have a Secondary School Diploma, including one course in English or français at the Grade 12 level.

Applicants from other universities

Applications from other Canadian or international universities will be assessed based on the applicant’s previous secondary and post-secondary studies. University equivalency credits may be granted depending on the studies completed and the program into which the person is admitted.

International applicants

Have a diploma attesting to 12 years of education equivalent to the Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD). Persons who have completed a secondary diploma attesting to 13 years of education, such as the Baccalauréat de l’enseignement secondaire français, can receive up to 30 credits of advanced standing. 

Mature applicants

When the applicant’s academic record does not meet normal conditions for admission, it is possible to apply as a mature applicant, provided that the person has not been enrolled in full-time studies for at least two consecutive years. In order to be considered for admission, applicants must have experience that can be considered sufficient preparation for pursuing undergraduate studies.

STEP 3: SUBMIT YOUR APPLICATION

 

You have two options

 

OPTION 1

If you are applying for admission to an undergraduate program at more than one Ontario university, including Saint Paul University:

 

Apply through OUAC

IMPORTANT NOTE: Because Saint Paul University is federated with the University of Ottawa, you will find programs offered by Saint Paul University listed under the University of Ottawa.

OPTION 2

If you are applying for an undergraduate program at Saint Paul University only, or if you are applying for a master’s or doctoral program:

  • Complete the following form.

 Apply Now

 

STEP 4: GATHER THE DOCUMENTS NEEDED FOR THE ASSESSMENT OF YOUR APPLICATION

 

In order for us to assess your application, you must submit official transcripts for all of your previous studies (secondary, college and university). These transcripts must be sent directly from your academic institution to the following address:

 

Saint Paul University
Office of Admissions and Student Services
223 Main Street
Ottawa, Ontario
K1S 1C4
CANADA

 

However, to expedite the assessment process for your application, you can scan your documents and e-mail them to the Office of Admissions at admission@ustpaul.ca and then send your official documents through the mail.

 

STEP 5: ASSESSMENT OF YOUR APPLICATION

Once the Office of Admissions receives all the required documents, it will begin to assess your application. One of the following decisions will be sent to you at the email address you gave us, as well as to your postal address.


Possible decisions

  • Offer of admission
    The Office of Admissions will send you an offer of admission (unconditional).  
  • Conditional offer of admission
    The Office of Admissions will make you a conditional offer of admission, with specific conditions that you must meet by a certain deadline. You can still proceed to registration (course selection).
  • Deferred decision
    The Office of Admissions can inform you that some information is missing and therefore the University is unable to make a decision regarding your eligibility. If applicable, the Office will tell you which documents to send and by what date.
  • Refusal
    The Office of Admissions will inform you of the reasons for the refusal.

 

STEP 6: ACCEPT YOUR OFFER OF ADMISSION

To accept an offer of admission and a scholarship offer, if applicable, you must sign the form entitled Admission acceptance form that accompanies your offer of admission and send it to Saint Paul University by email, before the deadline, to the following address admission@ustpaul.ca or mail it to:

Saint Paul University
Office of Admissions and Student Services
223 Main Street
Ottawa, Ontario
K1S 1C4
CANADA

 

STEP 7: CHOOSE YOUR COURSES

With your offer of admission, you will receive all the information you will need to choose your courses. You will also receive the contact information for our academic advisors; you can meet with them one on one or during information sessions for guidance and to help you finalize your course selection.

Compulsory courses (21 credits)

  • ECS2103 Negotiation
  • ECS2104 Mediation
  • ECS2191 Introduction to Conflict Studies
  • ECS2192 Inequality, Conflict and Social Justice
  • ECS2321 Listening and Interaction in Conflict Resolution
  • ECS3101 Introduction to Technical and Legal Aspects of Conflict Resolution
  • ECS3323 Dialogue

Optional courses (9 credits)

3 credits from:

  • ECS2124 Local and Community Responses to Conflict
  • ECS2126 Indigenous Peoples and Conflict
  • ECS2928 Conflits linguistiques au Canada / Language and Conflict in Canada
  • ECS2999 Tierce partie neutre/ Neutral Third Party

6 credits from:

  • ECS3110 Internship I
  • ECS3124 Conflict in Organizations
  • ECS3125 Peaceful Resolution of Violent Conflict
  • ECS3127 Group Processes and Conflicts
  • ECS3128 Consultation and Coaching in Conflicts
  • ECS3130 Special Topics in Conflict Studies
  • ECS3140 Gender Relations and Conflict

Some courses have specific prerequisites.

Certificate programs are part-time programs.

ECS 2103 - Negotiation

Concepts and foundations. Difference between mediation and negotiation. Case Studies. Ethical considerations. Role playing and practical exercises. Specificities of negotiation among ethnic and religious groups. A minimum of ten laboratory hours will be required in this course.

Prerequisite or concomitant: ECS2321.

ECS 2104 - Mediation

Concepts and foundations. Objectives of mediation, importance of third parties. Mediation and post-modernity. Ethical considerations. Role playing and practical exercises. Specificities of mediation among ethnic and religious groups. A minimum of ten laboratory hours will be required in this course.

Prerequisite: ECS2103.

ECS 2124 - Local and Community Responses to Conflict

Conflict is always experienced at a community level, whether its source is local or international. This course identifies and examines the many different ways in which local or community level actors respond to the causes and effects of violent and non-violent conflict in their midst.

ECS 2126 - Indigenous Peoples and Conflict

A review of conflict and peaceful coexistence between indigenous peoples and settler societies around the world, including the examination of (1) differences among the world’s indigenous peoples in their cultures, political economic situations, and in their relationships with colonizing settler societies and (2) efforts to transcend “contemporary colonialism” and “post-modern imperialism” to establish indigenously defined cultural, social, and political orders.

ECS 2191 - Introduction to Conflict Studies

A multidisciplinary introduction to research in the evolving field of peace and conflict studies, with emphasis on ethnic and religious conflict. Cases are drawn from local to global levels. Includes anthropology, sociology, psychology, history, political science, law, labour relations, theology, philosophy, gender studies and security studies.

ECS 2192 - Inequality, Conflict and Social Justice

This course consists of two components: (1) the examination of the variable linkages between inequality (economic, social, political), injustice, and violent conflict; and (2) the examination of efforts to create environments characterized by equality, equity, justice and peace.

ECS 2321 - Listening and Interaction in Conflict Resolution

Theory and practice of the listening skills crucial for participating in conflict resolution processes. Development of synthesis, reframing, and appropriate responses to difficult situations. Attention to non verbal communication, emotions, and communication styles. Exploration of some of cultural differences in communication. A minimum of ten laboratory hours will be required in this course.

ECS 2928 - Language and Conflict in Canada | Conflits linguistiques au Canada

Overview of relations between English- and French-speaking groups in Canada with emphasis on their identity components. Review of efforts undertaken at various levels to address tensions related to language differences. Dialogue and elaboration of proposals for improving linguistic relations.

Bilingual course. Students are expected to work in both official languages.

Prerequisite: ECS2321.

ECS 2999 - Neutral Third Party | Tierce partie neutre

Intensive training including simulations in which the participants play in turn the roles of conciliator, mediator and facilitator. The mark S or NS will be attributed following the handing in of a training report.

ECS 3101 - Introduction to Technical and Legal Aspects of Conflict Resolution

Introduction to some concepts pertaining to the analysis and resolution of conflict: judicial norms, contracts, binding character of judicial decisions, judicial organization and structures, formal processes of mediation and negotiation. The course also includes consideration of some aspects of international law, as well as principles of conflict management in key fields areas such as labour, social services, etc.

Prerequisites: ECS 2191 and ECS 2192.

ECS 3110 - Internship I

Internship in a reputed institution for a minimum of 150 working hours.

Prerequisites: 24 ECS credits and a cumulative grade point average of B+.

ECS 3124 - Conflict in Organizations

Introduction to the resolution of conflicts related to labour relations and policy differences in large organizations, especially in the public sector, with emphasis on ethnic and religious conflict. Roles of employers, workers, unions, third parties, mediation mechanisms, arbitration, and administrative tribunals.

Prerequisites: ECS 2191 and ECS 2192.

ECS 3125 - Peaceful Resolution of Violent Conflict

This course compares and contrasts different approaches to the pacific resolution of violent conflict, such as peace building, peacemaking, and peace operations. Contribution of religions to peace building. An effort is made to understand when, why, and how such approaches are effective or ineffective for managing and resolving conflicts.

Prerequisites: ECS 2191 and ECS 2192.

ECS 3127 - Group Processes and Conflicts

Introduction to the intervention toward groups in order to manage and resolve conflicts. Study of group dynamics and underlying behaviours. Review of different approaches to group processes. Exploration of the requirements and abilities for the leadership and facilitation of groups. Case studies. Practical in-class exercises.

Prerequisites : ECS2103, ECS2104.

ECS 3128 - Consultation and Coaching in Conflicts

Initiation to personal support to people involved in conflicts. Presentation of various models of personal and group coaching. Development of some basic abilities in this kind of intervention (including self-awareness, emotional intelligence, active and empathic listening, communication, overcoming resistance, etc.) through simulations and exercises.

Prerequisites: ECS2103, ECS2104.

ECS 3130 - Special Topics in Conflict Studies

Prerequisites: ECS2191, ECS2192.

ECS 3140 - Gender Relations and Conflict

Social and philosophical theories of gender. Feminist theories of discrimination and power relations as they apply in conflict situations. Ethnic and religious factors in gender-related conflict issues. Constructive responses and social movements.

Prerequisites: ECS 2191 and ECS 2192. This course was previously ECS2125.

ECS 3323 - Dialogue

Examination of dialogue as a means of exploring hidden beliefs and the exchange of ideas between participants. Practical exercises that explore the use of dialogue as a means of resolving and transforming conflicts. Training in the use of structured dialogue in professional activities. Specificities of dialogue among ethnic and religious groups.

Prerequisite: ECS2321.

Contact Us

Office of Admissions, Registrar and Student Services
Room 154
Saint Paul University
223 Main Street
Ottawa, ON
K1S 1C4
CANADA

Telephone: 613-236-1393
Fax: 613-782-3014
admission@ustpaul.ca

Hours of Operation

August 15 to May 31

Monday to Thursday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Friday 8 a.m. to 12 p.m.
1 p.m. to 4 p.m.

June 1 to August 14

Monday to Friday 8 a.m. to 12 p.m.
1 p.m. to 4 p.m.




Information for future students

Saint Paul University

223 Main Street
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
K1S 1C4

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Toll free
1.800.637.6859


613-236-1393

613-782-3005

info@ustpaul.ca

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