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ACADEMIC REGULATIONS - UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES

PREAMBLE

  1. DATE OF APPLICATION
  2. BILINGUALISM
  3. ADMISSION TO A PROGRAM
  4. CATEGORIES AND STATUS OF STUDENTS
  5. PROGRAMS OF STUDIES
  6. COURSES AND GRADING SYSTEM
  7. REGISTRATION TO COURSES AND INTER-UNIVERSITY AGREEMENTS
  8. COURSES AND EVALUATION
  9. ACADEMIC STANDING, PROBATION AND MANDATORY WITHDRAWAL
  10. CONDITIONS FOR OBTAINING A DEGREE, A CERTIFICATE OR A DIPLOMA
  11. SECOND DEGREE AT SAINT PAUL UNIVERSITY
  12. DISTINCTIONS
  13. RECORD RETENTION AND DESTRUCTION
  14. DECISION APPEAL

 

Academic Regulations – Undergraduate studies

Approved by the Senate on April 11, 2013

PREAMBLE

Saint Paul University is a Catholic university canonically established by the Holy See and thus subject to Canon Law and all pertinent Church documents as implemented in Canada.

Saint Paul University is committed to supporting students in their efforts to achieve their goals in regards to academic success. To this end, the University ensures the quality and relevance of its academic programs and develops a support network of services to help students throughout their university experience.

For their part, students must assume certain responsibilities. More specifically:

  • Choose a program of study suited to their personal goals, select courses that will satisfy the requirements of their chosen program, and consult resource persons available to them in different academic units when needed.
  • Become familiar and comply with Sessional Date Calendar and important dates and deadlines.
  • Become familiar and comply with university and faculty regulations and procedures.
  • Regularly consult the different communication tools used by the University (such as websites, assigned e-mail address).
  • Conduct themselves in a manner that respects the rights of other members of the University community and that complies with the regulations of the University and its different constituents, as well as with the laws applicable in Canada.

1-DATE OF APPLICATION

New academic regulations and changes to existing regulations take effect May 1 of each year.

New courses and new programs or changes to existing courses and programs take effect on May 1 of each year.

2-BILINGUALISM

Saint-Paul University uses the same practices pertaining to bilingualism as the University of Ottawa, to which she is federated:

Every student has the right to use French or English in his or her dealings with the Central Administration and the general services of the University and with the administration of the faculty or school in which he or she is registered.

Every student has the right to require that a course in which he or she is registered shall be given in the language used to describe the course in the current calendar, subject, however, to the regulations of the faculty or school respecting conditions to be satisfied in order for a course to be offered.

Except in language courses and courses in Lettres françaises and English, every student has a right to produce his or her work and to answer examination questions in the official language of his or her choice.

(Excerpt from the Regulation on Bilingualism at University of Ottawa (PART VI, paragraph 20), approved October 7, 1974).

3-ADMISSION TO A PROGRAM

Students who want to register for courses (full-time or part-time) in order to earn a degree must be admitted to a program of study. Once a student is admitted to a program, he or she is considered a regular student.

For a student to be admitted to a program, all of the program’s admission requirements must be met. The requirements and procedures for admission to a program of study can be found on the University’s website.

Admission to a program of study is not required for a special student.

3.1- Advanced Standing

The University may grant advanced standing for courses taken at other postsecondary institutions, provided that:

  • the courses content correspond to the  compulsory,  optional and elective courses in the program for which the candidate is applying;
  • the credits for these courses were earned while the student was a degree candidate in a comparable program at a recognized university or college;
  • the candidate has earned the passing grade in these courses;
  • an official transcript and a course description is presented with the request. A course outline could also be required.

Candidates who hold an Ontario or a Québec College Diploma could obtain automatic advanced standing. All measures are explained on the University’s website.

The maximum number of recognized credits is determined in respect of the Residency Requirements (section 10.1)

3.2-Prior Learning Recognition

The University recognizes that learning can occur with education (by taking university credit courses or its equivalent) as well as with experiences such as: professional experience, self-teaching, non-credited courses, workplace training and in other situations. Prior Learning Assessment (PLA) allows students who have acquired knowledge in a non-traditional manner to receive advanced standing for a course (specific course code) offered at the University or, in certain instances, to be granted an exemption.

Any specified advanced standing recognized by a Faculty is done on behalf of the University and therefore should be recognized by other faculties.

To have prior learning recognized, an individual must first be admitted to and register for a program of study.

The PLA request must be submitted to the Registrar’s Office during the first study session. The Registrar’s office can refuse any PLA and its decision is without appeal.

Advanced standing credits are awarded strictly for existing courses at Saint Paul University, part of the student's program of study, and offered at the University within the last 24 months. 

A maximum of 30 credits can be granted for prior learning recognition.

Advanced standing credits appear on the official transcript, but do not count as Saint Paul University residency requirements.

Credits obtained for prior learning might not be recognized by the discipline's licensing body or professional associations.

3.3-Interruption of Studies

Students whose studies are voluntarily interrupted for six consecutive sessions or less may reregister in the same program without having to submit another admission application. When studies are interrupted for seven consecutive sessions or more, students must submit a new application for admission.

4-CATEGORIES AND STATUS OF STUDENTS

4.1-Student Categories

Regular student: A regular student is a person who has been admitted to a program of study leading to an undergraduate degree or certificate at Saint-Paul University, and who is registered for one or more courses in that program.

Special student: A special student is a person who is allowed by the University to register for undergraduate courses in order to obtain university credits, but who is not seeking an undergraduate degree, certificate or diploma from the University. The reasons below may be cited to register as a special student:

  • Personal interest: Individuals who do not provide proof that they meet the normal admission requirements may register for personal interest for a maximum of six credits per session and a cumulative total of 30 credits, provided they have not attended a secondary school as a full-time student for at least two years.
  • Professional certification: Anyone may take university courses in order to meet the certification requirements of an outside professional association. A justification letter from the association is required.
  • Transfer of credits: A person may take Saint-Paul University courses for the purpose of transferring credits to another university or postsecondary institution where he or she is seeking a degree, diploma or certificate. A letter of permission or a formal written agreement from the student’s home institution is required. The student’s status (full‑time or part‑time) will depend on the number of credits taken with the permission of both the home institution and Saint-Paul University.
  • Upgrading: Individuals holding a recognized university degree may take courses at Saint-Paul University to update, improve or extend their training. Proof that the student holds a university degree is required.
  • Gifted student: Particularly gifted high school students in their last year of secondary school studies may, upon presentation of a written recommendation from their principal, enroll in one course (three credits) per session (maximum of six credits) while completing their secondary education.

4.2-Students Status

Full time: Status of a student registered for 12 credits or more during a session.

Part time: Status of a student registered for fewer than 12 credits during a session.

Auditor: Status of a student who has been authorized by one of the faculties (e.g. director of undergraduate studies or program director, in consultation with the involved professor) to take one or more courses without obtaining credits. Auditors are not entitled to write examinations, nor to hand in assignments and may not change their status after the deadline has passed for course changes for the session in which they are enrolled.

Session: Period during which the University's academic activities take place. In general, the fall and winter sessions run 12 weeks each, 1 study week and an exam period.

 The spring-summer session breaks down into sub-sessions with a varying numbers of weeks.

  • Fall session: September to December
  • Winter session: January to April
  • Spring-Summer session: May to August

5-PROGRAMS OF STUDIES

Programs of studies, as well as their requirements, are recommended by the faculties in question and approved by the Senate of the University.

When program requirements are modified, faculties must ensure that the changes involved do not penalize students already registered in the programs in question.

5.1-Categories of Offered Programs

General bachelor's: An undergraduate degree requiring the equivalent of three years of studies and at least 90 credits with the required cumulative grade point average (CGPA). The general bachelor’s provides a basic university education.   

Honours bachelor's: An undergraduate degree requiring the equivalent of four years of studies with the required cumulative grade point average (CGPA). There are six types of honours bachelor’s degrees:

  • Honours bachelor's with specialization: This degree is conferred upon completion of at least 120 credits including a program requiring in-depth training in a single discipline or in an interdisciplinary area of studies with a minimum of 54 credits. 
  • Honours bachelor's with specialization and a minor: This degree is conferred upon completion of the requirements as defined above, and of a minor, which introduces students to a field or sub-field within a discipline or particular area and consists of 30 credits.
  • Honours bachelor's with double major: This degree is conferred upon completion of a program involving intensive training in two main disciplines or two areas and consisting of 42 credits in each discipline or area, unless otherwise indicated.
  • Honours bachelor's with major and minor: This degree is conferred upon completion of at least 120 credits including a program involving both intensive training in one discipline (42 credits, unless otherwise indicated) and an introduction to a field or sub-field within a discipline or subject (30 credits).
  • Joint honours bachelors: This degree is conferred upon completion of at least 120 credits of a program allowing students to specialize in two related disciplines or fields and consisting of at least 42 credits in one discipline or field and 36 credits in the other.
  • Other Honour’s bachelors: This degree is conferred upon completion of at least 120 credits of a program requiring in-depth training in a single discipline with rules different than the Honours bachelor's with specialization (e.g. B.Th.)

Ecclesiastical Bachelor:  Saint Paul University offers ecclesiastical degrees that meet the standards set by the Congregation for Catholic Education. 

Certificate: The certificate is an independent undergraduate program requiring 30 credits.

PROGRAM STRUCTURES AND DISCIPLINE-SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS FOR BACHELOR'S DEGREES

 

Discipline Specific Component

Bachelor Degree

Minimum Required Average  *

 

3000 level credits

4000 level credits

Total credits

Total 3000

+4000

level

Total credits

CGPA

DGPA

Honours Bachelor's

             

- With specialization

18

6

60

36

120

4,5

5

- With major (requirements for the first major)

12

6

42

36

120

4,5

5

- Joint

24

12

84

36

120

4,5

5

General Bachelor's

             

- 3-year with minor

6

n/a

30

12

90

3,5

n/a

- 3-year without minor

n/a

n/a

n/a

12

90

3,5

n/a

* see sections 6.5 Official Grading System and 6.6. Grades and Calculating Averages

5.2-Specific Types of Programs

Major: A major involves intensive training in a main discipline or field of study. It consists of 42 credits in the discipline or field of study, of which 18 for courses at the 3000 level or above and at least 6 credits at the 4000 level.

Minor: A minor provides introductory-level training in a branch or sub-branch of a particular discipline or subject. It consists of 30 credits, of which at least 6 are at the 3000 level or above. The minor is a complementary program and does not allow direct admission.

Complementary program: A program (major or minor) that does not allow direct admission, but is instead taken in addition to a student’s main program.

Integrated program: A program in which the degree requirements of two separate bachelor's degrees are completed, thus leading to two separate diplomas.

Cooperative education: An academic stream offered in certain honours bachelor's programs where academic sessions alternate with paid work terms (placements);

5.3-Types of programs remaining available until May 2019 for students having registered before May 2012

Concentration program: An undergraduate program, usually three years in length, designed to provide students with a solid base in a single discipline.

Honours program: An undergraduate program, usually four years in length, comprising a coherent set of compulsory and optional courses that are successively more advanced, designed to provide students with a solid base in one discipline and prepare them for graduate studies. Honours programs usually require a higher standard of achievement than do general or concentration programs.

6-COURSES AND GRADING SYSTEM

A course is a set of teaching and learning activities.  The course calendar definition appears on the University website and has been proposed by a faculty as well as approved by the Senate.

Each course has its own identifying code, to which a specific number of credits and teaching or learning hours is assigned.

Professors are responsible for the teaching and learning activities of the courses and for their adherence to the University's policies and procedures.

6.1-Prerequisite Course

Refers to a course that must be passed before another course.  All exception must be approved by the undergraduate studies director or the program director.

6.2-Corequisite Course

Refers to a course that must be taken at the same time as another course, but that can also have been passed in advance.

6.3-Credit 

A credit is the numerical value assigned to an academic activity. Except for co-op work terms, intensive practicums covering extended periods and research projects, a credit generally represents 45 hours of work, including class attendance (lectures, labs, practical training), online attendance, personal work, practical assignments and exam preparation.

6.4-Course Code and Weight

Each course is identified by a seven character code as follows (e.g.: ECS2350):

  • the first three characters specify the discipline;
  • the fourth character indicates the year or level of the course;
  •  the fifth character identifies the language of instruction;
    • 1, 2, 3, 4: designates a course taught in English;
    • 5, 6, 7, 8: designates a course taught in French;
    • 0, 9 :
      • designates bilingual courses, where English and French are used equitably in the teaching of the course. Students can use the language of their choice, but they must at least understand the other language orally and in writing. The level of language required must be specified in the course description.  The characters 0 and 9 do not identify courses taught in rotation (sometimes  in French sometimes in English on a yearly basis);
      • designates language courses other than French or English;
      • designates individualized teaching (courses where no lectures are given), such as workshops, laboratories, practicums, clinical training, directed research or readings, etc. These characters can also be used for theses and comprehensive examinations.
      • Two courses that are equivalent in English and in French are identified by a difference of 4 in the value of their second number. Conversely, when two courses are not equivalent to each other, the difference in the value of their second number is other than 4. (e.g.: ECS 1100 and ECS 1500 are equivalent, but not ECS 1100 and ECO 1700.)
  • the sixth and seventh characters complete the course code and are left to the discretion of the University. One or two letters may be added at the end of a code to identify the course section or the campus where the course is offered.

6.5-Official Grading System

Saint-Paul University’s official grading system is alphanumeric, and it must be applied to all courses except those formally exempt by the University’s Senate.  Indeed, in some instances, the expected learning outcomes for a course require a « Satisfactory/Not satisfactory » or a « Pass/Fail » grading scheme.

Letter Grade

(on Official Transcript)

Numerical Value

(for Average Calculations)

Percentage scale value

A+

10

90-100

A

9

85-89

A-

8

80-84

B+

7

75-79

B

6

70-74

C+

5

65-69

C

4

60-64

D+

3

55-59

D

2

50-54

E

1

40-49

F

0

0-39

ABS

0

Absent

EIN

0

Failure/Incomplete

Other non-numerical grades – do not affect the student’s average

CR

-

Credited Course

NC

-

No Credit

P

-

Pass

S

-

Satisfactory

NS

-

Not Satisfactory

Passing Grade: At the undergraduate level, the passing grade is usually set at D.

6.6-Grades and Calculating Averages

Grade point: The grade point represents a student's performance in a course and takes the number of credits as well as the numerical value of the letter grade into account. To determine grade points, the number of credits for the course is multiplied by the numerical value of the letter grade.

Sessional grade point average (SGPA): The SPGA represents a student's overall performance for all courses in a given session. To calculate the SPGA, the sum of all grade points is divided by the sum of all course credits taken by the student during the session.

Annual grade point average (AGPA): The AGPA represents a student's performance over all courses taken during an academic year (May through April). To calculate annual grade point average (AGPA), the sum of all grade points is divided by the sum of all course credits taken by the student during the academic year (May through April).

Cumulative grade point average (CGPA):The cumulative grade point average represents the student's performance over all courses that make up his or her program of study. To calculate the cumulative grade point average (CGPA), the sum of all grade points is divided by the sum of all course credits taken by the student and that are part of his or her program of study. Decimals are rounded to the next highest number if the third decimal is 5 or higher and to the next lowest number if the third decimal is 4 or lower.

Diploma grade point average (DGPA): The diploma grade point average (DGPA) is a special measure of the student's performance required by certain bachelor's programs and taking strictly into account a sub-set of courses imposed by the program. The DGPA is calculated in the same way as the cumulative grade point average (CGPA), but considers only a sub-set of courses imposed by the program. The diploma grade point average is based on 2000-level courses and above, subject to the rule allowing a maximum of 15 credits to be taken anew (see section 7.4 Re-registration in a Course).

Grade point average of credited courses (GPACC): The grade point average of credited courses represents the part of a student's performance considered during a faculty transfer, a change of program or a re-admission. To calculate the grade point average of credited courses (GPACC), the sum of the grade points is divided by the total number of credits recognized by a faculty during a faculty transfer, program change or re-admission.

Application of Average calculation: For courses with supplementary exams, only the grade assigned after this exam is part of the grade point average calculation. Both grades (before and after the supplemental exam) appear on the transcript.

Grade point averages take into account only those courses completed at Saint Paul University and the University of Ottawa.

For courses taken a second time under the rule allowing for 15 credits to be repeated (see section 7.4 Re-registration in a Course), only the last grade is used for the grade point average. All grades for courses taken under the 15-credit repeat rule (before and after the supplemental exam) appear on the transcript.

6.7-Grade Report

The grade report lists the student’s academic results for a university session. The grade report is available as soon as grades for a session become official.

If the grade report contains errors or omissions, the student must notify his or her home faculty within sixty (60) business days following the date when grades become official. Otherwise, the grade report will remain unchanged.

6.8-Transcript

A transcript is an official document issued by the University.

The transcript lists all courses for which a student is officially registered at Saint Paul University, all corresponding academic results as well as all degrees, diplomas and certificates earned by the student.

A transcript issued to a student or to a third party authorized by the student will be marked "Issued to the student".

The group average and the number of students registered in the course are indicated on the transcript provided that at least six students are registered in the course.

A student with an outstanding balance or other financial obligations to the University cannot obtain a transcript or attend courses other than those where he is already registered..

6.9-List of Symbols on the Transcript

ABS (Absent) – Symbol used when a student has not attended the course, has not submitted any assignment and has not advised the University, within the time limits specified in the Important dates and deadlines schedule, that the course was dropped. This symbol is equivalent to a failing grade (F).

ADD (Additional) – Symbol used when a student is authorized to register for a course in addition to those required in the program of study. The grade for this course is included in grade point average calculations.

AUD (Auditor) - Symbol used when a student registered as an auditor.

CR (Credited course) – Symbol used for a course, taken with success in another institution, with the prior authorization of the student’s faculty. The course grade is not included in the grade point average calculation; only the credits are indicated on the transcript.

CTN (Continuing) – Symbol used for a course or an activity which carries over into the next session.

DFR (Deferred) - Symbol used when the appropriate authority considers that the student has not completed the course requirements for a valid reason. The student will have to complete such requirements by the date set by the faculty. If no mark has been filed with the Office of the Registrar twelve months after the end of the course, the DFR symbol will be changed to EIN.

DR (Drop) – Symbol used when a student has dropped the course within the time limits specified in the Important dates and deadlines schedule. This symbol is not associated with a mark and, therefore it does not affect average calculations.

EIN (Failure/Incomplete) – Symbol used whenever a student has failed to complete a significant portion of the course assignments and/or examinations. Such symbol is equivalent to a failure mark (F).

Q (Advanced standing) – Symbol used for a course previously completed with success in another academic institution, and that is recognized as part of the student’s program of study at Saint Paul University.

HP (Extracurricular) – Symbol used for a course for which the student registered in addition to the program of study requirements, and for which no credits will be granted. The result of an extracurricular course is not included in grade point average calculations.

NC (No credits) – Symbol used when no credits are associated with a course. This symbol has no numeric value and is not included in average calculation.

NNR (Mark not submitted) – Symbol used until a final mark is filed with the Office of the Registrar.

NS (Not satisfactory) – Symbol used for a failed course that is not included in grade point average calculations.

P (Pass) – Symbol used to indicate success in an internship report submitted with respect to the co-op education stream, a course or an activity. This result is not included in grade point average calculations.

S (Satisfactory) – Symbol used for a successfully completed course that is not included in grade point average calculations.

6.10-Citations

Citations are awarded to students who complete the requirements  of an undergraduate degree, according to the following cumulative grade point averages:

SUMMA CUM LAUDE : 9.0 and above
MAGNA CUM LAUDE : 8.0 – 8.9
CUM LAUDE :  7.0 – 7.9

7-REGISTRATION TO COURSES AND INTER-UNIVERSITY AGREEMENTS

Registration includes procedures relative to course selection and tuition fees payment and other related fees.

Once they are admitted in a program of study as a regular student or authorized to register as a special student, a student must comply with registration procedures and deadlines indicated in the Sessional Dates Calendar.

A student who is not registered for a course or related academic activity will not receive a grade or credits. Retroactive course registration or course modification is not permitted.

7.1-Maximum Course Load by Session/Year

A student may register for a maximum of 15 credits simultaneously during an academic session, unless the structure of their program requires a higher number of credits. To register for more than 15 credits during one academic session, students require permission from the academic advisor as well as an annual grade point average (AGPA) of at least 7.0 during the previous academic year.

7.2-Program of Study Changes

If an undergraduate student wishes to change programs, a request must be submitted to the Academic Advisor. If the change is approved, courses on the student file that can be transferred will be retained in the calculation of the grade point average.

7.3-Voluntary Withdrawal

All withdrawal from a course or modification of regular student status to auditor has to be made prior to the deadline indicated in the Sessional Dates Calendar. Failure to do so will result in the course appearing as EIN (Failure/Incomplete) on the student’s file, which is the equivalent of a failure mark (F).

7.4-Re-registration in a Course

It is permitted, in an effort to improve a grade or expand knowledge, to repeat a course, either passed or failed.

The provisions of this regulation apply subject to the specific requirements of certain programs (ex. internships).

The following conditions apply:

  • Registration priority is given to students who have never taken the course in question or have taken it but failed.
  • All courses taken and repeated appear on the student’s transcript.
  • For the first fifteen (15) credits repeated, the grade received on the last try replaces the previous grade and is used in the calculation of averages. A failing grade can therefore replace a passing grade.
  • Students who receive a failing grade in a compulsory course they have repeated must take that course again, even if they passed it the first time.
  • Students cannot repeat a successfully completed course that is a prerequisite for another course they have already taken and passed.

7.5- Credit Transfers

Credit transfers with the University of Ottawa

Saint Paul University students may take courses that are part of their program of study at the University of Ottawa, subject to availability, without paying additional tuition fees. Payment of the related complementary fees is required.

 To be eligible for a credit transfer, students must meet the following requirements:

  • be admitted to a program of study at Saint Paul University;
  • be registered at Saint Paul University for the session during which the credit transfer will occur;
  • be in good academic standing;
  • provide proof that they have successfully completed prerequisite courses.

Courses completed at the University of Ottawa which meet the student’s program requirements are credited towards the degree sought at Saint Paul University and count towards residence requirements. Grades obtained for these courses are included in grade point average calculations.

Students must comply with each university’s sessional dates.

Credit transfers with other universities

 To take one or more courses at a university with which Saint Paul University has no formal agreement, students comply with the following conditions:

  • be admitted to a program of study at Saint Paul University;
  • be in good academic standing;
  • obtain a letter of permission of his academic advisor (deadlines for requesting a letter of permission are April 15th for the spring-summer session, August 15th for the fall session, and December 15th for the winter session);
  • provide proof that they have successfully completed prerequisite courses.

Students are responsible for ensuring that an official transcript is sent to Saint Paul University as soon as the session ends. Otherwise, a NC grade will appear on their transcript. For these courses, an CR/NC grade appears on Saint Paul University transcript.

Students are responsible for ensuring that an official transcript is sent to Saint Paul University before May 15th to take part in spring convocation and before September 15th to take part in fall convocation.

The grades obtained for courses completed outside Saint Paul University are not included in grade point average calculations.

Courses taken at another university with a letter of permission do not count towards residence requirements at Saint Paul University.

International Exchange Programs

To take part in an international exchange program approved by Saint Paul University, a student must:

  • obtain prior authorization from his Faculty;
  • normally take a course load equivalent to full-time status at Saint Paul University.

Courses successfully completed through such an exchange program will appear on the transcript.

When the renewal of excellence and merit scholarship depends on maintaining a specific grade point average, full-time students who successfully complete courses at a partner institution abroad are considered to have fulfilled the scholarship renewal conditions.

8-COURSES AND EVALUATION

8.1-Course Syllabus

Professors must supply a course syllabus during the first meeting with the students. This course syllabus must include:

  • the official course description approved by Senate;
  • general and specific learning outcomes of the course;
  • a calendar of activities and evaluations;
  • teaching methods;
  • evaluation methods and distribution of grades;
  • a list of required and recommended readings;
  • the professor’s contact information and office hours;
  • Other particular requirements (e.g. specific faculty regulation);
  • a reference to the regulation on plagiarism and academic fraud.

8.2-Course Attendance

Course attendance is determined by faculty regulation, approved by the Senate. The faculty regulation must specify if a student’s attendance to his courses can be an element of evaluation and a condition of final exam participation. If so, this information must appear in the course syllabus.

8.3-Evaluation of Student Learning

Normalization of Grades

The use of a predetermined distribution (statistical or otherwise) in order to determine the assignment of marks is contrary to the principles of evaluation endorsed by Senate. Faculties must take appropriate measures to ensure that members of the teaching staff assign marks which accurately reflect the definitions of student performance established in the official grading system.

When a faculty deems that the assignment of marks in one or several courses is not in accordance with the official grading system or with the faculty guidelines for its implementation, the faculty can take any corrective action required, provided however that no such measure result in a mark lower to that previously communicated to a student.

Final Examination

Except in certain rare cases authorized by the faculty or the school, there is a final examination or its equivalent in each course. The final examination or its equivalent should be completed during the examination period. The professor, with the approval of the faculty or the school, determines the format of the final examination (written examination, oral examination, final essay, take-home examination, or other form of exam). Written final examinations are either two or three hours long.

The final examination, or its equivalent, cannot count for more than 60 per cent or less than 30 per cent of the final grade.

Professors must inform their students of the nature of the final examination when informing them of the marking system at the beginning of the course.

All students have the right to see their examination booklets after they have been marked.

Assignment

The same assignment cannot satisfy the requirements for more than one course unless there has been pre-authorization from the concerned professors and individual.  A copy of the authorization must be placed in the student’s file.

8.4-Official Examination Period

No final examination of any kind may be given outside of the official examination period.

No test with a value exceeding 10% of the final grade may be given during the last week of classes in a session.

8.5-Attendance at Examinations

During examinations or tests, students are prohibited from using electronic devices or any other communication tool that has not been approved beforehand.

Any such device or tool must be shut off, stored and out of reach.

It is the student's responsibility to verify which electronic devices or tools (e.g. calculators) are permissible for each examination or test.

Anyone who fails to comply with these regulations may be charged with academic fraud.

8.6-Justification of Absence from an Examination or of Late Submission of Assignments

Absence from any examination or test, or late submission of assignments due to illness, psychological problems or exceptional personal circumstances must be justified by one of the following situations and comply with the following procedures;

-Medical grounds

  • Students must directly notify their professor or the academic secretariat of the faculty where they are registered, before the exam or before the assignment deadline.
  • Before accepting the student’s justification, the professor or the faculty’s academic secretariat has the right to request a medical certificate from the attending physician (including the student’s name, the date of both the absence and the return to studies, the medical consultation date, and the physician’s signature).
  • If the authenticity of the medical certificate is in question, the professor or the faculty’s academic secretariat may request that it be validated by the University of Ottawa’s Health Services.
  • If the medical problem is not foreseeable, students must notify their professor or the academic secretariat of the faculty where they are registered and submit a medical certificate bearing the date of the absence within five working days of the exam date or the assignment deadline, except if extenuating circumstances prevent them from doing so; these circumstances must be documented.
  • Students who write an examination during the period of disability specified on the medical certificate cannot later plead illness to appeal their examination results.

-Psychological problems

  • Students must directly notify their professor or the academic secretariat of the faculty where they are registered, before the exam or before the assignment deadline.
  • Before accepting the student’s justification, the professor or the faculty’s academic secretariat has the right to request either a certificate from the attending physician or from a psychologist (including the student’s name, the date of both the absence and the return to studies, the consultation date, and the physician’s or psychologist’s signature) or a supporting letter issued by Saint-Paul University’s or the University of Ottawa’s Counselling Service.
  • If the authenticity of the certificate is in question, the professor or the faculty’s academic secretariat may request that it be validated by the University of Ottawa’s Health Services.
  • If the psychological problem is not foreseeable, students must notify the professor or the academic secretariat of the faculty where they are registered and submit a certificate bearing the date of the absence within five working days of the exam date or the assignment deadline, except if extenuating circumstances prevent them from doing so; these circumstances must be documented. 
  • Students who write an examination during the period of disability specified on the certificate cannot later plead psychological problems to appeal their examination results.

-Exceptional personal circumstances

Absence from an examination or test and the late submission of assignments due to exceptional personal circumstances must be justified in writing within five working days of the date of the examination or test or the assignment deadline.  The academic unit and the faculty concerned reserve the right to accept or reject the reasons presented.  Reasons such as travel, work and misreading of examination schedules are not accepted, except in exceptional and properly documented circumstances.

8.7-Religious Accommodations

Saint Paul University values its diverse community and wishes to formalize its practices on accommodation for religious observances by students. In March of each year, the Registrar informs the Deans of the dates of commonly cited religious holidays for the upcoming academic year to facilitate the handling of requests for accommodation for religious observances.

The Ontario Human Rights Code (“Code”) provides that every person has the right to equal treatment with respect to services without discrimination because of creed.  The Ontario Human Rights Commission has stated that “creed” means a professed system and confession of faith, including beliefs and observances, if the beliefs and observances are sincerely held and/or observed.  “Creed” does not include secular, moral or ethical beliefs or political convictions.

These Guidelines outline a process for addressing religious observances that conflict with the scheduling of a student’s academic or course-specific requirements.  It is intended to assist in responding to students’ religious observances while ensuring that the integrity of the course or program of study is not compromised. The term “reasonable accommodation” used in these Guidelines will depend on the facts and the circumstances present in each individual case.

 A student who wishes to make a request for an accommodation based on his or her religious observance must do so by submitting a written or electronic request to the professor responsible for the course or to the appropriate authority designated by the faculty.  The request for accommodation must identify the nature of the religious observance and the requested accommodation.  The student is expected to assist the professor or designated authority in efforts to implement reasonable accommodation, including in identifying solutions that may be reasonably pursued to address the request.

The following timelines should be observed when a request for accommodation is initiated:

  • for an academic requirement published in the course syllabus or otherwise communicated during or before the first class: within two weeks of the start of the course;
  • for an academic requirement communicated after the first class: within five working days of the requirement being communicated to the class; and
  • for a final examination: within five working days of the publication of the final examination schedule.

The professor or designated authority and student will consult to reach an agreement on the reasonable accommodation arrangement.  If the professor or designated authority requests clarification or additional information, the student must respond in a timely manner, normally within a maximum of five working days. The professor or designated authority may consult with other University staff while respecting confidentiality policy as appropriate.

If a mutually agreeable solution cannot be reached within a reasonable time period, taking into account relevant academic deadlines and the time required for arrangements to be finalized, the student must immediately send a written request to the Dean or other person designated by the Faculty who will make a final decision. 

The Dean or other person designated by the Faculty may request additional information from the student or the professor and may consult with other University staff, where appropriate.  The Dean or other person designated by the Faculty will inform the student and the professor of his or her decision in writing, usually within two weeks of the student’s request to the Dean or other person designated by the Faculty.

8.8-Procedure on Cancellation or Postponement of Exams

Special circumstances may require particular measures during final exams and supplemental exams. Closed bridges, snowstorms, bomb scares, fire requiring evacuation, etc. are all examples of special circumstances. To avoid confusion, misunderstandings and disappointment, we have to clarify how to deal with them.

Faculties wanting more stringent requirements than those described below must ensure that professors and students are well aware of its particular requirements.

Cancellation of all exams on a given day:

  • This decision will be made so that students are informed by 8:00 am;
  • Notification will be posted on the index page of the University website; exams will be automatically rescheduled during the first or second weekend after the start of classes of the following semester;
  • New exam times will be posted on the index page of the University’s website.

Absence of a chief invigilator to the examination

  • Copies of all exams are always available at the faculty secretariat, with instructions on how to administer the exam in question, so that it can take place nonetheless.

Absence of a group of students because of special circumstances (recognized by the Vice-President Academic and Provost, or his or her representative):

  • Students who are present at the examination must be permitted to write the examination. The invigilator should be tolerant if some students arrive late.
  • For those students who have missed the examination, the Faculty must determine, in consultation with the professor, the arrangements for a special examination. The students must then be informed as soon as possible.

 Exam Interruption: In major circumstances (bomb scares or fires) that necessitate room or building evacuation, the decision to resume or not the examination is taken on location; the professor or the chief invigilator might decide:  

  • to continue the exam as soon as everyone is allowed to re-enter the building, or
  • to stop the exam; if the exam is cancelled, the faculty puts in place, after consultation of the professor, the necessary measures to organise a special exam and inform the affected students as soon as possible.

8.9-Supplemental Examination in the Event of Course Failure

The right to a supplemental exam for each student who obtains an «E» as a final grade for a course is determined by the Faculty, approved by the Senate. 

When a course has a supplemental exam, only the grade obtained after the supplemental exam is used for the grade point average. Both grades (before and after the supplemental exam) appear on the transcript.

8.10-Revision of Grades and Appeals

The University recognizes the right of every student to see, on request after grading, all documents that have been used to establish their grade for courses in which they are duly registered; the documents include those produced by the students themselves or evaluations written by supervisors (as part of work terms, clinical placements or internships).

The University also recognizes students’ right to ask for a grade review and to appeal grades.

General provisions

  • When students do not understand a grade assigned to them, the University encourages them to contact their professor or practicum supervisor for clarifications or for the reasoning behind the grade.
  • If students still question the grade despite the explanations they receive, they can ask for a review, as set out in this regulation.
  • The revised grade can be higher than, lower than or equal to the grade submitted for review.
  • The grade review cannot be cancelled once the process has been completed and the new grade assigned.
  • This regulation applies to grade reviews for all courses under the Saint Paul University responsibility.
  • This regulation also does not apply to technical errors (calculation errors, transcription errors, omissions, etc.), because they are quickly corrected by professors themselves.
  • A request for revision for any given mark may only be submitted once.

First stage: Grade review

  • Students who are not satisfied with their grade after discussing the matter with their professor can ask for a grade review.
  • When grade reviews can take place during the session, students must submit their request within five (5) working days of receiving the contested grade. For grades received on final exams or in cases when grade reviews take place only at the end of the session, the request must be submitted within ten (10) working days after the grade in question becomes official (see the University calendar for the exact date).
  • Students submit their requests for grade reviews in writing to the chair of the academic unit offering the course. The request must include a) the course title, the course syllabus, the grade assigned and the name of the professors having assigned it, b) the grounds for the appeal, and c) the assignment/test corrected by the professor, if applicable, and other relevant documents.
  • The chair of the academic unit, or a designate, immediately sends a copy of the student's request to the professor concerned, inviting him or her to submit in writing any comments as well as the evaluation criteria used for the test or assignment, and other relevant documents. When appeals can be made during a session, professors must respond within five (5) working days for tests given during the session. For final tests and exams or in cases when appeals can take place only at session's end, professors must respond within ten (10) working days.
  • Upon receiving the required documents from the professor, the chair of the academic unit, or a designate, asks at least one other professor to review the test or assignment under appeal and forwards all documents from the student and the grading professor to this reviewing professor.  The chair of the unit, or a designate, must ensure that the reviewing professor possesses the necessary professional qualifications. The reviewer`s anonymity must be maintained. When appeals can be made during a session, the review must be done within five (5) working days for tests given during the session. For final tests and exams or when appeals can take place only at session's end, the review must be done within ten (10) working days.
  • Based on all of the documents received, including all evaluations (initial evaluation and revisions), the chair of the unit, or a designate, determines the grade to be awarded and immediately informs both the student and the professor in question.
  • Students have the right to obtain a copy of all the documents used in reaching the decision.

Appealing work-term grades, clinical placements or internships

  • Students who fail a work term or practicum and who do not agree with the grade received may, after discussing the matter with their work-term supervisor, ask for a grade review; students must submit their appeal no more than ten (10) working days after receiving their grade at the end of his/her work term.
  • Students must submit their appeal in writing to the Dean (or his delegate) of their Faculty.   The appeal must include a) all work-term-related information, such as the course title, the course syllabus, the number of work-term days, the work-term location, the type of supervision, the grade obtained, and the name of the supervisor having assigned the grade, as well as b) the grounds for the appeal, c) the work-term evaluation reports and d) all other relevant documents.
  • The chair of the academic unit, or a designate, immediately sends a copy of the student's request to the supervisor(s) concerned, inviting him or her to submit in writing any comments, as well as the evaluation criteria explained to the student, and other relevant documents. Supervisors must respond within ten (10) working days. 
  • Upon receiving the required documents from the supervisors concerned, the chair of the academic unit, or a designate, asks one or several other professors to assess the request for review (the appeal), forwards all documents from the student and the grading supervisors to these reviewing professors, and asks them for recommendations (ex., maintain the grade or have the work term, clinical placements or practicum repeated in whole or in part).  The chair of the unit, or a designate, must ensure that the professor or these professors possess the necessary professional qualifications. This review must take place immediately.
  • Based on all of the documents received, the chair of the academic unit, or a designate, determines the grade to be awarded and immediately informs the student, the professor the supervisors, and the faculty in question.

Appeals

  • A student may appeal to the Interpretation of Academic Regulations Committee to contest decisions handed down after an initial grade review (section 14).

8.11-Providing feedback prior to the withdrawal deadline

Providing students with feedback on their academic work is a key part of learning because it allows them to assess their progress in a course. Therefore, professors should assign, evaluate and return academic work that is worth at least 25% of the final course mark no later than one week prior to the deadline for withdrawal without academic penalty. When feedback cannot be provided before this date, due to the nature of the course, this should be clearly indicated in the course syllabus.

9. ACADEMIC STANDING, PROBATION AND MANDATORY WITHDRAWAL

The following standards of academic standing apply to all bachelor's programs at the University except those having received special approval from the Senate..

9.1-Academic Standing

To continue studies in a given program without special conditions, a student must be in good standing, i.e. the student's official record must indicate a cumulative grade point average equal to or greater than the required minimum for the program.

In the honours bachelor's program, students must maintain a minimum cumulative grade point average of at least 4.5 to be in good standing. In other programs, students must maintain a minimum cumulative grade point average of at least 3.5 to be in good standing.

9.2-Probation and Probation Lifting

Subject to regulations on mandatory withdrawal, students whose cumulative grade point average falls below the required minimum for the program may be allowed to reregister by their faculty, but will be on probation if they do so.

The probation is lifted when the student's cumulative grade point average reaches the required minimum for the program.

9.3-Withdrawal from a Program of Study

Students on probation whose cumulative grade point average remains below the minimum required for good standing after two full time probationary sessions or after 24 course credits if part time will be required to withdraw from the program.

Mandatory withdrawal is required in the following cases:

  • failure in courses totalling 18 credits (excluding courses taken more than once) or
  • a second failure in a mandatory course.

A student who is subject of a mandatory withdrawal from a program of study must remain out of his program for 12 months from the withdrawal date.

9.4-Re-registration

Students in honours programs whose cumulative grade point average is below 4.5 may opt to reregister in the honours program with probationary status or register in a general bachelor's program. In the latter case, they will not be on probation unless their average is below 3.5.

9.5-Registration in Additional Courses

Students who have not met the minimum CGPA and/or DGPA required in their program upon completing all the course requirements may enrol in additional courses, to a maximum of 24 credits, to meet the requirements. The courses must be at the 2000 level or higher.

10-CONDITIONS FOR OBTAINING A DEGREE, A CERTIFICATE OR A DIPLOMA

The Senate of the University confers a degree upon a student who has fulfilled all of the requirements for the program or programs leading to that degree or statement of studies and complied with all applicable academic regulations.

10.1-Residence Requirements

To obtain a degree from Saint Paul University, a student must complete at least 50 percent of the credits at Saint Paul University, regardless of specific requirements, except in the case of formal agreements between Saint Paul University and other institutions.

10.2-1000 Level Courses

No more than 42 credits at the 1000 level can be obtained to qualify for a bachelor’s degree.

10.3-Required Grade Point

To obtain a general bachelor’s degree student must maintain a minimum cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of at least 3.5. 

To obtain an honours bachelor's degree, students must maintain:

  • A cumulative grade point average equivalent to or higher than 4.5; 
  • A diploma grade point average (DGPA) equivalent to or higher than 5.0. When the DGPA is calculated, 1000-level courses are not taken into account.

To obtain a certificate, students must maintain a cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of at least 3.5. 

10.4-Duration of Studies

When students have not obtained a degree after eight (8) years of study, the faculty may require them to take additional courses in order to fulfill their program requirements. For certain programs, these requirements might be subject to professional accreditation rules.

10.5-Registration for Degree

In order for their names to be submitted to the Senate, students who expect to complete their degree requirements must fill in the Registration for Degree and Request for Diploma form and send it to the Office of the Registrar no later than March 31st for spring convocation and no later than September 15th for fall convocation.

All final grades needed to complete the degree requirements must be received by the faculty before May 15th for students registered for spring convocation and before September 15th for students registered for fall convocation.

Students must have no outstanding debt towards Saint Paul University.

Students are responsible for ensuring that they meet all their degree requirements.

11-SECOND DEGREE AT SAINT PAUL UNIVERSITY

Students holding a certificate Saint Paul University may obtain a second certificate. To do so, they must meet the requirements of the second certificate and obtain at least 50 percent of the credits required for the second certificate beyond the requirements of the first certificate.

Students holding a first bachelor’s degree from Saint Paul University may obtain a second one. To do so, they must meet the requirements of the second degree and obtain at least 30 credits beyond the normal requirements of their first degree.

At least 50 percent of the additional credits received as part of the second degree must be taken at Saint Paul University.

Obtaining a second bachelor’s degree – Possible combinations

 First bachelor obtained

Options for the second bachelor

Current programs of studies

a) Honours with specialization A

Field(s) other than A

b) Honours with specialization A + minor B

Honours with specialization B

Honours with specialization B + minor C

Honours with major B + major C

Honours with major B + minor C

c) Honours with major A + major B

Honours with specialization A

Honours with specialization A + minor C

Honours with specialization B or

Honours with specialization B + minor C

 d) Honours with major A + minor B

Honours with specialization A  

Honours specialization B + minor C

Honours with specialization B or

Honours with specialization B + minor C

Honours with major B + major C

Honours with major B + minor C

e) Three-year general bachelor

Honours with specialization x

Honours with specialization x + minor y

Honours with major x + major y

Honours with major x + minor y

f) Three-year general bachelor + minor A

Honours with specialization A

Honours with specialization A + minor B

Honours with major A + major B

Honours with major A + minor B

 Four-year general bachelor with major A

 Four-year general bachelor with minor B + minor C

g) Three-year general bachelor with minor A + minor B

Honours with specialization A

Honours with specialization A + minor C

Honours with specialization B

Honours with specialization B + minor C

Honours with major B + major B

Honours with major A + minor C

Honours with major B + minor C

 Four-year general bachelor with major A

 Four-yeargeneral bachelor with major B

1. Former programs of studies

a) Concentration A

Honours with specialization A

Honours with specialization A + minor B

Honours with major A + major B

Honours with major A + minor B

Four-year general bachelor with major A

b) Concentration A + concentration B

Honours with specialization A

Honours with specialization A + minor C

Honours with specialization B

Honours with specialization B + minor C

Honours with major A + major B

Honours with major A + minor C

Honours with major B + minor C

Four-year general bachelor with major A

Four-year general bachelor with major B

c) Honours A

Field(s) other than A

d) Honours A + concentration B

Honours with specialization B

Honours with specialization B + minor C

Honours with major B + major C

Honours with major B + minor C

Four-year general bachelor with major B

12-DISTINCTIONS

The University recognizes student merit by awarding many distinctions at Convocation.

Changes to distinctions cannot be made once the Senate has officially conferred degrees.

Students cannot change their graduation date or the date of their Convocation ceremony for the purpose of receiving a distinction.

The recipient of a medal or a plaque at the Fall Convocation must have a cumulative grade point average equal to or higher than that of the recipient of the same medal or plaque at the Spring Convocation.

12.1-Governor General's Silver Medal

This medal is awarded at the Spring Convocation to the student having obtained their degree in the last 12 months as well as the highest standing in an honours bachelor's program.  In case of a tie between two or more candidates for the same award, the cumulative grade point average (CGPA) is calculated manually to an infinite number of decimals in order to determine the candidate with the highest standing. If there is still a tie, the following weighting factors are applied, in this order: diploma grade point average (DGPA) and the average obtained in the compulsory courses for the completed program of study.

12.2-Awards

Students receiving an award at the Convocation ceremony must obtain a degree at the ceremony in question. Exceptionally, for awards conferred only once a year, the degree may be obtained at the previous Convocation, but in the same academic year (for instance, a degree may be obtained in the spring and the award conferred in the fall, but not the other way around).

Awards are conferred according to the criteria set out by the sponsors.

12.3-Dean’s Honour List

Only the following students will have their name placed on the Dean’s Honour List.

  • Full-time students who maintained an annual grade point average (AGPA) of 8.5 or higher; and
    • in the year prior to the list being compiled, accumulated at least 24 credits over two sessions; or
    • were registered in a CO-OP program or
    • participated in an international exchange and who accumulated at least 12 credits in a single session during the preceding 12 months.
  • Part-time students who maintained a cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 8.5 or higher and have accumulated 30, 60, 90 or 120 credits. For these students, the names to be added to the Dean’s Honour List will be determined after each block of 30 credits.

Nomination to the honour list is indicated on the transcript for the session when it was awarded.

13-RECORD RETENTION AND DESTRUCTION

Information stored in the Student Information System is retained indefinitely.

The documents contained in a student’s record are retained for as long as the student is registered and during seven (7) consecutive sessions, following the student’s departure from the University (graduation or withdrawal). Afterwards, the documents and transactions in the student record are destroyed, unless the student has provided a valid reason for having the record retained longer.

However, the record of a student having received a sanction due to academic fraud will be retained indefinitely.

For special students (not earning a degree), the University retains only signed registration-related forms, for a period of two years.

The University reserves the right to destroy students’ examination booklets and other written work six months after the date the final grade is official.

14 – APPEAL OF DECISIONS

For all academic matters, a student may appeal a decision to the Interpretation of Academic Regulations Committee (IARC).  However, the student must have exhausted all internal remedies prior to proceeding with an appeal.

A student who wishes to contest a decision must do so within ten business days by lodging his appeal in writing to the IARC president.  The appeal request must include:

  • a detailed letter explaining the situation, his or her motives for the appeal i.e. the reasons for which the decision should be overturned or modified as well as the desired outcome;
  • a list of all internal parties or individuals that were consulted; professor, program director or dean, Council of Undergraduate Studies or the Faculty’s Executive Committee or in cases of academic regulations that fall solely within the scope of the registrar, the staff with whom he or she met and the registrar;
  • all other pertinent documents;
  • student’s contact information (student number, postal address, telephone number, e-mail address) in order to be able to contact him or her.

As soon as the appeal is received, a copy of all the documentation provided is sent to the faculty concerned. The faculty must provide its comments within fifteen working days.

Once the faculty's comments have been received, they are sent to the student who must respond within fifteen working days, after which the IARC will proceed with the appeal.

The president will then convene the IARC.  The student will then be invited to present his appeal and answer questions before the IARC.

In general, the IARC renders its decision within the same day of the hearing.  However, sometimes the committee may request additional information in order to make its decision.

The decision is communicated the following week via e-mail.

IARC decisions are final and without appeal.

The IARC is a committee of the Senate.